Tag: atheist

What’s Good // What’s Bad

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This weekly feature gives you the best of what’s good and what’s bad out there in the snarkiverse. This content is explored more in-depth on our weekly radio show, Snarky Faith, so you should check that out too. Without further adieu… here’s your rundown this week of the good, bad and ugly of the interwebs. Enjoy!

•  First, Christians didn’t want to bake wedding cakes for LGBTQ couples, but now a right-wing pastor, Lance Wallnau, is claiming that an ‘anointed cake’ freed a man from homosexuality. What’s next, donuts that cure heresy? Wait, I may need a dozen of those. Either way, this is Pat Robertson level craaaaazy. [JMG]

• An Alabama church wants to have their own armed police force. I thought the Bible was supposed to be the sword of the spirit, but apparently, someone’s been watching a little too much John Wick. This is what happens when the non-violent Jesus isn’t sexy enough and the church feels that all of this trusting in God business is way easier when you’re packing heat. Who would Jesus Shoot – WWJS [Huff Po]

• Enough of all the bad, want to hear a story about how the government is actually working together to make a positive change? Full Frontal with Samantha Bee aired a segment about the passing of a bill that will allow thousands of rape kits to be tested. This renewed my faith (briefly) in humanity and government.

•  We’ve got Nerf darts all over our house, but I’ve never once picked one up and thought, “I bet this can break the sound barrier.” Apparently, I was wrong. So much for being soft and safe.  [Uproxx]

If you see any snark-worthy news that’s either good or bad, feel free to send it us: questions@snarkyfaith.com. Have a great week!

 

What’s Good // What’s Bad

Share on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page
This weekly feature gives you the best of what’s good and what’s bad out there in the snarkiverse. This content is explored more in-depth on our weekly radio show, Snarky Faith, so you should check that out too. Without further adieu… here’s your rundown this week of the good, bad and ugly of the interwebs. Enjoy!

• Everyone beware the dastardly anarchists of Portland! They’re sticking it to the man and creating havoc by… fixing potholes on the city streets? Yep, you read that right and Portland is having nothing of it. Join the resistance and fix something that helps the greater good. [Huff Po]

• A rabbi, a priest, and an atheist smoke weed together and talk about religion. Yep, it sounds like a joke, but it’s a beautiful picture of different viewpoints bonding (and bong-ing) around a common table. How about giving up preconceived notions for Lent. Anyone with me?

• We can’t have all good on the list this week with Trump’s new proposed budget torpedoing everything left in the government that was compassionate and beneficial. With planned cuts to the EPA, the Endowment of the Arts and even Meals on Wheels in [NPR] & [Huff Po]

• So guess what? While the governmental good gets the ax, the military and the wall get funded? Yeah, that’s a bad as bad can get. [ProPublica]

• Need some palate (or soul) cleansing after those last few points, how about some Bonhoeffer? Read about how Dietrich Bonhoeffer can speak to life in the Trump age. It’s an outstanding reminder of how we can (and should) learn from history and those that came before us. [Englewood Press]

If you see any snark-worthy news that’s either good or bad, feel free to send it us: questions@snarkyfaith.com. Have a great week!

 

I Love Atheists

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We live in such a time where dialogue doesn’t seem to happen anymore. We yell past one another with each side digging in their heels safe behind fences and walls getting while drunk on their own smug posture and warped sense of righteousness. We live in a war of words where the idea of moderation or discourse is laughable and seemingly forgotten. So there it remains, each side camped and waiting for attack.

Look at issues like abortion, climate change, gay marriage or any other issue that’s been politicized and volleyed around between religious and political circles. So the issues (and potential solutions) remain frozen in place and will remain there as long as we continue this course.

So how do we brake such a deadlock? It’s not easy, but I believe that the road to change begins when we commence seeing the value in the other side (those that are not like us). When we can start to see that the “other” isn’t much different than we are, we realize that we’re all just human trying to make sense of the world around us. There may have been different circumstances and events that brought each of us to our respective points, but we all have a story. There are no real enemies aside from inflexibility and pride.

I want to start a dialogue here and will begin by picking a fight for the side that most Christians love to demonize… the atheists.

Full disclosure, I’ve been a pastor and worked in churches or Christian based non-profits for the last 13 years. I’ll also add that I have friends who are atheist (along with other belief streams). I value other perspectives and sides. Stepping into a dialogue and breaking bread with people who are not like myself has always been something I value immensely. I value our conversations , their questions and friendship because true friendship isn’t about only having friends who believe what you do. It’s funny how we’re willing to accept so many differences in people, but when it comes to hotbed topics like religion, we draw the line.

Here’s what I value most about atheists:

  1. They refuse to be saddled with the damaging effects of religion
  2. They desire community
  3. They celebrate authenticity
  4. They want freedom from oppression
  5. They value asking questions
  6. They seek knowledge
  7. They are tried of fear mongering
  8. They want to help the world to become better
  9. They live mindfully
  10. They respect humanity

If anyone would bother to read atheists writers, you’d find people tired of being told what is true and an intense desire to seek that truth on their own merit. Historic Christianity has been oppressive – mentally, spiritually and otherwise. It has done terrible things in the name of God while being veiled in human deceit and hunger for power. Less about God and more about man.

There’s no problem with criticism if it speaks to glaring holes in your own stance. Critiques should inspire and drive us to be better, not become stodgy and defensive.

You see, most of atheist critiques of Christianity have tremendous merit and value. The god they are tired of being told to fear, isn’t a god that I would want to follow either. So in many ways, I understand their pursuits. I, also, am tired of the way Christianity has become political, fear based and oppressive. I’m tired of this strong arm and abusive tactics. We’ve forgotten how to love and serve the world. The way it marches and in America, it seems little like the way Jesus intended. If American Christianity is about following American Jesus, then I’d rather be an atheist as well.

Thankfully, Jesus isn’t about all of that. I choose to follow Christ because of how it changes me and helps me to engage the world around me. My pride and the way I love others is constantly challenged. In my own spiritual journey, I don’t have it figured out. I’m still learning and growing. I appreciate the push back, because it helps me to have a faith that evolves. I appreciate the views, drive and aim of atheists and continue to look forward to future conversations because it helps me continue to follow Jesus.

What are your thoughts?

__________________

This post is part of the March Synchroblog, in which each participant writes what they appreciate about another religion or belief system.

Easter Resolutions

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Image by: Clyde Robinson

I know resolutions are typically bundled with New Years, but I think we should tack on that tradition to Easter as well. This year’s resolution for Christians should be: “Let’s stop arguing with Atheists.” Seriously, we should. Just be quiet and respect them where they’re at. We often time do more damage by trying to change them. Following Christ has never been about a cerebral or logical argument. It’s about a choice of the heart and a walk of faith.

Why do I say this? Well, currently Lee Strobel is in a war of words with Ricky Gervais over Easter and atheism. Gervais started with writing about being a good Christian even though he’s Atheist.  Then Strobel countered with How Easter Killed my Faith in Atheism.

It just feels like arguments of these types (though both well spoken) tend to entrench both sides. Let’s enjoy Easter and focus on Christ and the needs of our community. That’s a better place to start. Otherwise we run the risk of just creating noise and losing Jesus in the argument.

Check out here Ricky Gervais’ colorful opinion of Easter. He’s a hardcore atheist and I think the chip on his shoulder has been cemented pretty well by fundamentalist Christians. It’s a funny bit – just be aware his mouth isn’t censored.   I love his line “a fundamentalist view of history is like an episode of the Flintstones!”

Any thoughts?