Tag: colbert

Jesus at Trump Tower

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jesus at trump tower
Part 2 of our talk with Karl Giberson and a dramatic reading of Jesus at Trump Tower

Snarky Faith 2/21/17

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Join us for part two in our conversation with professor and author Karl Giberson. Karl is the Science and Religion professor at Stonehill college and author of many books such as Saving Darwin and Worlds Apart: The Unholy War between Religion and Science. Karl also penned a satirical series for the Huffington Post called, Jesus at Trump Tower. We discuss his motivations in writing and also have a dramatic reading of Jesus at Trump Tower. We’ve also got What’s Good // What’s Bad chronicling the interweb’s best and worst of the week.

Buckle up for a wild ride as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.



 

What’s Good // What’s Bad 2.21.17

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This weekly feature gives you the best of what’s good and what’s bad out there in the snarkiverse. This content is explored more in-depth on our weekly radio show, Snarky Faith, so you should check that out too. Without further adieu… here’s your rundown this week of the good, bad and ugly of the interwebs. Enjoy!

• Ken Ham, you saucy minx of a creationist. You have truly outdone yourself this time… and I don’t say that lightly. This past week, via Twitter, the Answers in Genesis poster-boy debuted a new exhibit in his Kentucky’s “Ark Encounter” theme park that features humans, giants, and dinosaurs battling to the death in a Roman-style arena. Sure this sounds crazy, but you know what’s worse? The fact that they dropped $101 million to create the Ark Experience to push their new earth agenda. Hey Ken, sometimes the answers are not in Gene$i$, they’re apparently in your wallet. This smells like someone is taking a page out of Jim Bakker’s playbook. Heritage USA anyone? 

 

• After that ark madness, want something truly great to bring a smile to your face? Sure we all do. This may go down in history as one of the best post-game interviews ever. Check out pool player, Naoyuki Oi’s post-match interview in all its broken-English glory. It’s pure joy. The British interviewer couldn’t even handle himself as he simply responded, “I’ve not ever done an interview quite like this…”

• I’ll be the first to admit that I incidentally, yet routinely butcher people’s names. It’s not my strongest suit, but, I’m also not the White House press secretary. Feel like, having Sean Spicer butcher your name? With the help of the Sydney Morning Herald you too can be spicer-ized. Spicey dubbed me Stubbins Delt. Drop your ‘new’ name in the comments section below.  [SMH]

• If you enjoy the wilted delights of canned veggies, you may want to read this interesting article that dives into the FDA’s Defect Levels Handbook. It’s reassuring to know that we have acceptable lives of large and mildew in our food. Yummers! [Huff Po]

• Ever want to see Donald Trump eat his own words? Well, are some wise words from candidate Trump speaking about the failings of President Trump (sort of). Retroactive hypocrisy has never been so much fun. Thanks Stephen Colbert!

• Looking for a great read? You should head on over to Kimberly Stover’s great blog post entitled, “If Being a Christain Means XYZ, then I am NOT a Christian.” That’ll preach.

• Living in Trump’s world can be pretty taxing and stressful for a lot of us. Living in the bizarro world is never easy, but I’ve got a great way for you to relax. Electronic singer-songwriter, Moby, has created some amazing ambient music for this just issue. To put it in his own words, “over the last couple of years I’ve been making really really really quiet music to listen to when I do yoga or sleep or meditate or panic.  I ended up with 4 hours of music and have decided to give it away.”

Who doesn’t like free music?  [Download Long Ambients1 by Moby here]

If you see any snark-worthy news, feel free to send it us: questions@snarkyfaith.com. Have a great week!

 

Let’s Talk About Silence

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A snarky take on Silence

Snarky Faith 2/7/17

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A rundown of Martin Scorsese’s movie Silence, based on the 1966 novel of the same name by Shūsaku Endō. This was a tough movie to get through, but a rewarding and powerful one, none the less. Join us as we talk about the importance of doubt in the journey of faith. We also have an interview with Scorsese presented by FULLER studio. It’s an outstanding talk about his faith and how it impacts his films. We’ve also got What’s Good? What’s Bad? chronicling the interweb’s best and worst of the week. Buckle up for a wild ride as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.


For more resources for a deeply formed spiritual life can be found on Fuller.edu/Studio.



 

Colbert and the Problem with Nostalgia

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By: Mark Rain

Stephen Colbert premiered as the new host of the Late Show last night to good reviews. The show was fun, a bit overlong, but as anything with Colbert, filled with great promise for years to come. It’s been funny to watch the reactions on Twitter and the comment sections of web reviews. The one comment (or iteration of the same comment) I kept seeing was something along the lines of “I miss Dave [Letterman].”

This struck me as funny because most people haven’t even been watching Letterman on a regular basis since the 90’s. This isn’t a knock against Dave, but one about how we choose to see the past. That’s the problem with nostalgia. The good old days get frozen in time and begin to ferment with age. Some memories get better in our minds, while others sour. The past is either idolized or demonized.

Back in high school, I saw Cabin Boy (a Letterman produced movie where he also makes a cameo) twice on the opening day (don’t judge). I thought it was awesome and hilarious. I couldn’t get enough. I probably alone accounted for half of the weekend’s opening box office sales. Returning to the film years later, I have no idea what I was thinking. It was more about the moment in time and the friends I was with. It was less about the actual cinematic quality of the film. In memory, the moment trumps the reality.

There’s nothing inherently wrong with this until we begin to assume absolute truth to the history of our memories. With the instance of Colbert, we have folks comparing one show to decades of Letterman’s best on TV. Dave had his moments, but with most of comedy, for every laugh, there are also three times as many jokes that went flat. Unless the joke went epically wrong (Uma-Oprah), we tend to only remember the high times.

Outside of entertainment, I’ve seen this happen in two prominent areas: politics and religion. I know these aren’t the only places we see nostalgia run amok, but they seem to be the places that scream (or preach) at us the loudest.

If you made a drinking game out of every time a Republican made a reference to Reagan during presidential campaigns, you’d die from alcohol poisoning. Politicians love to prey on the nostalgia factor because you can make promises out of memories, and they don’t ever have to be real. Hearken to the past you want to remember, and declare that you can take the present back there again. It’s a thing of fairy tales. The last thing we need right now is fairy tales.

In our churches, we play the similar game. Yesterday is framed as a more innocent time with less evil, less sin, and better morality. The message again is that we need to get back there. The funny thing about this is that we were never there. There has always been sin, evil, and corruption since the world began. The idea that there’s more of it today than yesterday is simply a farce, and it plays at our longing for nostalgia. Like politics, our faith can and should have a voice in our lives that drive us to engage deeply in the problems of the world. It’s not an excuse to run to the nostalgia of the past.

We can’t move backward. Moving backward means living in a world where smallpox is still a present issue or women and African American’s can’t vote. You can’t go back to the glory days and not get the mess that was present then. Hen picking memories can never be a reality. It’s counter productive and not healthy. When we live in the past, it clouds our vision for the present.

We can certainly learn lessons from history and recognize that we stand on the shoulders of those that have come before us. We just can’t go back. For the world to be a better place we need to be fully engaged in the present. Should we celebrate the past? Absolutely. We’re just not meant to live there.

Letterman had his day in the sun, and it was great. Today is not his day anymore. Hopefully, Colbert will move forward into years of late night greatness. With us, there are so many present issues pressing on life today: immigration, climate change, inequality and poverty (to mention a few). These problems won’t go away and require us to step into them with sober eyes fully focused on the present. You can’t solve a problem by wishing it wasn’t there. Nostalgia has its place, it just doesn’t move us forward.