Tag: faith

Eclipse Insanity

Share on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page
A snarky take on the American eclipse

A rundown of the conservative Christian insanity over the eclipse. If natural sights and wonders lead you to condemn others while you profit off your careers you have definitely taken a wrong turn (spiritually). Instead of navel-gazing, we need to see the obvious evil in the world today and seek to find ways to deal with it. Here’s a hint… there’s more evil in the White House, in our churches, and amongst the Trump supporters than there is up in the skies. Stop looking for up for answers and engage well with the problems of today. Hypocrisy may pay the bills for Christian leaders, but it steals your soul and has nothing to do with God’s kingdom.

Come along for the ride with us!

Join us as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.

black_download_button_aa22c4b316be6f4bc130


 

Racism, Business as Usual and the Church

Share on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page
A snarky take on Charlottesville, VA

White nationalists and counter-protesters gathered in Charlottesville, Virginia. Violence ensued. How should people of faith respond to racism in America? We’ll talk through 10 every way days we allow racism to still happen. We live in a crazy world and sanity, humanity and compassion should drive us forward into the future. Hopefully.

Come along for the ride with us!

Join us as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.

black_download_button_aa22c4b316be6f4bc130


 

The Sociopathic Church

Share on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page
A snarky take on the antisocial, personality disorder that plagues the church

A rundown of the sociopathic nature of the American church. Let’s talk about Franklin Graham’s man crush with Putin and the rest of the crazy. The Christian church has lost its way and there’s nothing right with the right. So what should be done now? How do we fix this disorder that plagues faith?

Come along for the ride with us!

Join us as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.

black_download_button_aa22c4b316be6f4bc130


 

The Journey In and Out of Faith

Share on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page
A snarky take on the bumpy road of faith.

A rundown of the journey in and out of faith with Max. Max was raised in the Orthodox community of Riverdale in the Bronx. Buckle up as we talk about that tenuous road of faith that is seldom gets talked about. That idyllic path of belief and faith is rarely a simple, straight path. There’s a part of Max’s story that speaks to all of us.

Come along for the ride with us!

Join us as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.

black_download_button_aa22c4b316be6f4bc130


 

What’s Good // What’s Bad

Share on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page
This weekly feature gives you the best of what’s good and what’s bad out there in the snarkiverse. This content is explored more in-depth on our weekly radio show, Snarky Faith, so you should check that out too. Without further adieu… here’s your rundown this week of the good, bad and ugly of the interwebs. Enjoy!

•  First, Christians didn’t want to bake wedding cakes for LGBTQ couples, but now a right-wing pastor, Lance Wallnau, is claiming that an ‘anointed cake’ freed a man from homosexuality. What’s next, donuts that cure heresy? Wait, I may need a dozen of those. Either way, this is Pat Robertson level craaaaazy. [JMG]

• An Alabama church wants to have their own armed police force. I thought the Bible was supposed to be the sword of the spirit, but apparently, someone’s been watching a little too much John Wick. This is what happens when the non-violent Jesus isn’t sexy enough and the church feels that all of this trusting in God business is way easier when you’re packing heat. Who would Jesus Shoot – WWJS [Huff Po]

• Enough of all the bad, want to hear a story about how the government is actually working together to make a positive change? Full Frontal with Samantha Bee aired a segment about the passing of a bill that will allow thousands of rape kits to be tested. This renewed my faith (briefly) in humanity and government.

•  We’ve got Nerf darts all over our house, but I’ve never once picked one up and thought, “I bet this can break the sound barrier.” Apparently, I was wrong. So much for being soft and safe.  [Uproxx]

If you see any snark-worthy news that’s either good or bad, feel free to send it us: questions@snarkyfaith.com. Have a great week!

 

What’s Good // What’s Bad

Share on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page
This weekly feature gives you the best of what’s good and what’s bad out there in the snarkiverse. This content is explored more in-depth on our weekly radio show, Snarky Faith, so you should check that out too. Without further adieu… here’s your rundown this week of the good, bad and ugly of the interwebs. Enjoy!

• Everyone beware the dastardly anarchists of Portland! They’re sticking it to the man and creating havoc by… fixing potholes on the city streets? Yep, you read that right and Portland is having nothing of it. Join the resistance and fix something that helps the greater good. [Huff Po]

• A rabbi, a priest, and an atheist smoke weed together and talk about religion. Yep, it sounds like a joke, but it’s a beautiful picture of different viewpoints bonding (and bong-ing) around a common table. How about giving up preconceived notions for Lent. Anyone with me?

• We can’t have all good on the list this week with Trump’s new proposed budget torpedoing everything left in the government that was compassionate and beneficial. With planned cuts to the EPA, the Endowment of the Arts and even Meals on Wheels in [NPR] & [Huff Po]

• So guess what? While the governmental good gets the ax, the military and the wall get funded? Yeah, that’s a bad as bad can get. [ProPublica]

• Need some palate (or soul) cleansing after those last few points, how about some Bonhoeffer? Read about how Dietrich Bonhoeffer can speak to life in the Trump age. It’s an outstanding reminder of how we can (and should) learn from history and those that came before us. [Englewood Press]

If you see any snark-worthy news that’s either good or bad, feel free to send it us: questions@snarkyfaith.com. Have a great week!

 

Discover What Materializes Between a Billionaire and Jesus

Share on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page

Ever wonder what a conversation would look like between Jesus and President Donald Trump? Well, wait no longer. Here’s the Snarky Faith interpretation of a hypothetical interaction between the heavy-weight savior and the orange-light-weight POTUS. If you didn’t catch this on our show, here’s the dramatic reading of Karl Giberson’s satire “Jesus at Trump Tower.”

Enjoy.

black_download_button_aa22c4b316be6f4bc130

You can find Karl’s original piece here: [Huff Po]

 

Let’s Talk About Silence

Share on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page
A snarky take on Silence

Snarky Faith 2/7/17

black_download_button_aa22c4b316be6f4bc130

A rundown of Martin Scorsese’s movie Silence, based on the 1966 novel of the same name by Shūsaku Endō. This was a tough movie to get through, but a rewarding and powerful one, none the less. Join us as we talk about the importance of doubt in the journey of faith. We also have an interview with Scorsese presented by FULLER studio. It’s an outstanding talk about his faith and how it impacts his films. We’ve also got What’s Good? What’s Bad? chronicling the interweb’s best and worst of the week. Buckle up for a wild ride as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.


For more resources for a deeply formed spiritual life can be found on Fuller.edu/Studio.



 

Blessed are the meek, for yours is the Kingdom of God

Share on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page
Photo by: urban_data

Guest post by Darius Abyecto //

What happens when we talk about Scripture? Our words lay a path that points our feet in a certain direction. Or perhaps, our feet are pointed in the direction laid for us by the words of others. Often, these words follow a trajectory around our centers of gravity, which are points of reference in our immediate context. We tell ourselves stories that flow around these cultural centers, following the path of least resistance. More specifically, we pick and choose those points of reference that correspond to the ways that we understand ourselves in our context. These notions are not revolutionary: that we each read scripture with a lens shaped by our own perspectives and the influence of our tribes.

If we accept this presumption, how might we understand Jesus’ words here? Some have interpreted Jesus’ teaching (or rather, the subsequent Christian tradition) as delaying justice for existing suffering into a transcendent Kingdom. Similarly, some have understood such a subversion as weaker people creating a moral system so that they can exert power over stronger people. Some read this passage as an imperative that the followers of Jesus be meek, whether in possession or in desire. Each of these readings aids in constructing Christian identity, either from the outside as critique, or from the inside as a participant. Is it possible to read this scripture as an imperative to abandon our quest to further construct identity? Is this a case of losing our lives in order to find them?

The Kingdom of God belongs to the meek, as Jesus denotes possession in his statement. Thus, if one does not belong to “the meek”, then one does not possess the Kingdom of God. Jesus also uses a present verb to describe this possession. Jesus did not say, “Blessed are the meek, for yours will be the Kingdom of God.” Unless something has changed since Jesus spoke these words, the meek currently possess the Kingdom of God. Jesus capitalizes this statement of possession by emphasizing that the meek are blessed.

I take away several points of emphasis from Jesus’ statement here, and each point leads me further from a quest to construct some sense of identity. In fact, this statement challenges that quest in its essence. First, if I am not meek, then the Kingdom does not belong to me. Now, as mentioned above, this notion has lead people to reconstruct their identities as “meek” in the past. However, I read this to mean that if I am not meek, then I am sojourning in someone else’s territory when I step foot into the Kingdom of God. I have become the foreigner, the stranger, and the wanderer. Neither bible study, nor donation, nor volunteering, nor virtue purchase a plot of land in this Kingdom.

Subsequently, the ones who possess the Kingdom are blessed. Channeling the ancients, blessed refers to a life of divine favor, or a life to be sought after. If we want to envision “our best life”, then, at least in part, we should expect to be meek. I remember listening to a pastor talk about spending time with a local businessman who had become a multi-billionaire because he wanted to learn from someone who “obviously” had the wisdom and blessing of God. Clearly, this is not what Jesus envisioned. Meek refers to someone who is bent over, cowering, low to the ground, impoverished, and destitute. In other words, the meek are those who have been put on the opposite of a pedestal; they have been put into the pit. Laying low, the meek are often imperceptible in our field of vision. We pass by the meek every day, either averting our eyes so that we can avoid inconveniencing our routine self-affirmations, or simply gazing through the meek, as they are unworthy of our attention. The meek are a difficult group to pose for our standard, as they are invisible to our eyes.

So, if I am not meek, then what am I? Jesus’ teaching makes me become a question to myself. Rather than declaring myself blessed, I ask for mercy, because I am not the blessed. Rather than asking to be sought out or listened to, I would rather seek out and listen to those who are nearly impossible to see. I need to see rather than be seen. In an age of pictures, opinions, rationales, posts, likes, subcultures, logos, brands, bylines, and buzzwords, Jesus’ words here tear down rather than construct. I am not. Or maybe, I need to learn from those who don’t quite have an “I am”, or whose “I am” sits like Lazarus being licked by the dogs. Rather than build a temple to myself, should I not search under every stone to find the meek, the blessed, sitting just outside the gate? These are the ones who possess the Kingdom, and these are the ones that are our blessed.


Darius Abyecto
Polymath, zenarchist and all around monkey wrencher. My passions include reading the fine print, making lists, and the Bourse du Travail. I always learn from the mistakes of others who take my advice. Currently pursuing a PhD in the architecture of pits and wells.

Crank Up the Hypocrisy

Share on TumblrTweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponDigg thisEmail this to someonePrint this page
A snarky take on Christian hypocrisy

Snarky Faith 1/31/17

black_download_button_aa22c4b316be6f4bc130

A rundown of all you need to know about Christian hypocrisy in regards to Trump’s refugee ban. With theological hypocrisy wildly slapping about in a politically fueled haze, how people of faith should respond? We’ll delve into scripture for answers and fire a few warning shots at some of the culprits (*cough cough* Franklin Graham). Buckle your seat belts and crank up the hypocrisy… it’s going to be a fun ride. We’ve also got What’s Good? What’s Bad? chronicling the interweb’s best and worst of the week. Join us as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.

Tune in and come along for the ride…