Tag: religion

In God We Trump

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A snarky take on Trumpian Christianity

A rundown of the current level of crazy with conservative Christians in America. We talk through some of the craziest, politically motivated crap from Christians in the news. We also have documentary filmmaker, Christopher Maloney, on the show to talk about his Kickstarter campaign to make a film about the current state of politics in America called In God we Trump. Come along for the ride with us!

Join us as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.

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Music Rewind

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A snarky take on musicians

A rewind of old interviews with musicians from the Snarky Faith vaults. Andrew Belle is a prolific American singer-songwriter from Chicago, Illinois. Ben Lee is an international music icon and activist from Australia. Both of these interviews showcase different artistic voices in the musical spectrum. Enjoy the fascinating musicians and their takes on what it looks like to make art!

Join us as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.

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How to Fix the Crazy

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A snarky take on Christianity’s Trump problem

A rundown of what you need to do to stay sane in the face of a crazy world. Yes, the world is nuts, our President is crazy, but so is the American Church. Join the conversation about why our Americanized version of advocacy makes no sense. Whether we’re talking about religion or politics, the answer to crazy is finding places where you can invest yourself in places that actually matter. Social media advocacy has no place unless you’re willing to step into the messiness of life. Change only happens when we invest deeply. Anything else is just self-indulgent narcissism. So get off your ass and do something.

Join us as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.

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Easter Doom!

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A snarky alternative take on Easter

A rundown of why Easter should be a paradigm for the American Church. Something needs to die so it can be reborn. We are stuck within such an institution of crazy and power grabbing that we’ve fallen miles away from our original mission. We need demolition and death before we can be thrust the church into resurrection. So let’s exit the crazy, hypocritical, greedy, hateful, narcissistic Christianity that has become the norm of the American Church. If Easter tells us anything, we need death to move towards life. So let’s leave behind the crazy of the American church and look towards something new.

Join us as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.

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Why Creation Care Matters

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A snarky take on creation care

Why should creation care matter to Christianity? Join us for part two of our talk with activist and author, Matthew Sleeth as we talk about why care for the environment is an essential ethic woven through scripture. Sleeth talks about how engaging in activities from gardening to environmental activism can connect us to the Creator. Creation care is a beautiful spiritual discipline that has long been lost in many Christian circles and one that the religious-right is downright antagonistic against. But there is always hope for renewal.

And there’s always What’s Good // What’s Bad chronicling the interweb’s best and worst along with a little never-ending,  Neverending Story treat (for the children of the 80’s).

Join us as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.

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Finding a Silver Lining in the Trump Budget

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A snarky take on Trump’s implosive budget

Is there a silver lining in Trump’s prospective budget? Amongst the proposed fiscal carnage, there may be a slim chance at hope for Christians to recapture their mission. Join us as we delve into how the New Deal changed the American church and led to a loss of identity. We also have part one of an interview with activist and author, Matthew Sleeth.

And there’s always What’s Good // What’s Bad chronicling the interweb’s best and worst.

Join us as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.

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Unchained at Last

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A not-so-snarky talk about about forced marriage in America today

Snarky Faith 2/28/17

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Join us for our conversation with activist and founder of Unchained at Last, Fraidy Reiss. Unchained At Last is the only nonprofit in the US dedicated to helping women and girls leave or avoid arranged/forced marriages and rebuild their lives. Unchained also is the only nonprofit in the US dedicated to creating social, policy and legal change to end forced marriage in America. Fraidy has a powerful message about this unseen epidemic in America. We’ve also got What’s Good // What’s Bad chronicling the interweb’s best and worst of the week and a rant about Christians and boycotting.

Buckle up for a wild ride as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.



 

Jesus at Trump Tower

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jesus at trump tower
Part 2 of our talk with Karl Giberson and a dramatic reading of Jesus at Trump Tower

Snarky Faith 2/21/17

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Join us for part two in our conversation with professor and author Karl Giberson. Karl is the Science and Religion professor at Stonehill college and author of many books such as Saving Darwin and Worlds Apart: The Unholy War between Religion and Science. Karl also penned a satirical series for the Huffington Post called, Jesus at Trump Tower. We discuss his motivations in writing and also have a dramatic reading of Jesus at Trump Tower. We’ve also got What’s Good // What’s Bad chronicling the interweb’s best and worst of the week.

Buckle up for a wild ride as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.



 

Blessed are the meek, for yours is the Kingdom of God

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Photo by: urban_data

Guest post by Darius Abyecto //

What happens when we talk about Scripture? Our words lay a path that points our feet in a certain direction. Or perhaps, our feet are pointed in the direction laid for us by the words of others. Often, these words follow a trajectory around our centers of gravity, which are points of reference in our immediate context. We tell ourselves stories that flow around these cultural centers, following the path of least resistance. More specifically, we pick and choose those points of reference that correspond to the ways that we understand ourselves in our context. These notions are not revolutionary: that we each read scripture with a lens shaped by our own perspectives and the influence of our tribes.

If we accept this presumption, how might we understand Jesus’ words here? Some have interpreted Jesus’ teaching (or rather, the subsequent Christian tradition) as delaying justice for existing suffering into a transcendent Kingdom. Similarly, some have understood such a subversion as weaker people creating a moral system so that they can exert power over stronger people. Some read this passage as an imperative that the followers of Jesus be meek, whether in possession or in desire. Each of these readings aids in constructing Christian identity, either from the outside as critique, or from the inside as a participant. Is it possible to read this scripture as an imperative to abandon our quest to further construct identity? Is this a case of losing our lives in order to find them?

The Kingdom of God belongs to the meek, as Jesus denotes possession in his statement. Thus, if one does not belong to “the meek”, then one does not possess the Kingdom of God. Jesus also uses a present verb to describe this possession. Jesus did not say, “Blessed are the meek, for yours will be the Kingdom of God.” Unless something has changed since Jesus spoke these words, the meek currently possess the Kingdom of God. Jesus capitalizes this statement of possession by emphasizing that the meek are blessed.

I take away several points of emphasis from Jesus’ statement here, and each point leads me further from a quest to construct some sense of identity. In fact, this statement challenges that quest in its essence. First, if I am not meek, then the Kingdom does not belong to me. Now, as mentioned above, this notion has lead people to reconstruct their identities as “meek” in the past. However, I read this to mean that if I am not meek, then I am sojourning in someone else’s territory when I step foot into the Kingdom of God. I have become the foreigner, the stranger, and the wanderer. Neither bible study, nor donation, nor volunteering, nor virtue purchase a plot of land in this Kingdom.

Subsequently, the ones who possess the Kingdom are blessed. Channeling the ancients, blessed refers to a life of divine favor, or a life to be sought after. If we want to envision “our best life”, then, at least in part, we should expect to be meek. I remember listening to a pastor talk about spending time with a local businessman who had become a multi-billionaire because he wanted to learn from someone who “obviously” had the wisdom and blessing of God. Clearly, this is not what Jesus envisioned. Meek refers to someone who is bent over, cowering, low to the ground, impoverished, and destitute. In other words, the meek are those who have been put on the opposite of a pedestal; they have been put into the pit. Laying low, the meek are often imperceptible in our field of vision. We pass by the meek every day, either averting our eyes so that we can avoid inconveniencing our routine self-affirmations, or simply gazing through the meek, as they are unworthy of our attention. The meek are a difficult group to pose for our standard, as they are invisible to our eyes.

So, if I am not meek, then what am I? Jesus’ teaching makes me become a question to myself. Rather than declaring myself blessed, I ask for mercy, because I am not the blessed. Rather than asking to be sought out or listened to, I would rather seek out and listen to those who are nearly impossible to see. I need to see rather than be seen. In an age of pictures, opinions, rationales, posts, likes, subcultures, logos, brands, bylines, and buzzwords, Jesus’ words here tear down rather than construct. I am not. Or maybe, I need to learn from those who don’t quite have an “I am”, or whose “I am” sits like Lazarus being licked by the dogs. Rather than build a temple to myself, should I not search under every stone to find the meek, the blessed, sitting just outside the gate? These are the ones who possess the Kingdom, and these are the ones that are our blessed.


Darius Abyecto
Polymath, zenarchist and all around monkey wrencher. My passions include reading the fine print, making lists, and the Bourse du Travail. I always learn from the mistakes of others who take my advice. Currently pursuing a PhD in the architecture of pits and wells.

The Divine Dance Interview with Mike Morrell

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The Divine Dance Interview
A snarky take on the Trinity and The Divine Dance

Snarky Faith 12/13/16

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A rundown of the new bestselling book, The Divine Dance, with co-author Mike Morrell. Mike wrote the book with spiritual heavyweight Father Richard Rohr. Does the Trinity really matter today in contemporary Christianity? Morrell and Rohr would assert an affirming, “YES!” So join us as we delve into why the Trinity matters in today’s world, what this means for us and how we can return again to our spiritual roots. Anyone in the mood to dance with us?

Tune in to find out more…

Download an exclusive bonus chapter to The Divine Dance over at Mike’s blog here.

WARNING: this interview may rankle the ire of Calvinists and the Gospel Coalition, but that just means all the more snarky fun for the rest of us! Enjoy.