Tag: Theology

How to Talk to People

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A snarky take on Christian communication

In the wake of all of this religious division and Christian insanity – or Christinsanity (stop trying to make fetch happen!), I had a listener ask for advice on how to talk with people that didn’t believe the same way they did. Let’s talk about how to talk with people who don’t believe like you. If we can see the common humanity in the ‘other’ we can walk out our faith in a meaningful way. Being hateful and angry is so 2016. So how do you evangelize the right-leaning conservative Christian? Join us to find out how to talk to people.

Come along for the ride as we skewer through life, culture, and spirituality in the face of a changing world.

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Blessed are the meek, for yours is the Kingdom of God

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Photo by: urban_data

Guest post by Darius Abyecto //

What happens when we talk about Scripture? Our words lay a path that points our feet in a certain direction. Or perhaps, our feet are pointed in the direction laid for us by the words of others. Often, these words follow a trajectory around our centers of gravity, which are points of reference in our immediate context. We tell ourselves stories that flow around these cultural centers, following the path of least resistance. More specifically, we pick and choose those points of reference that correspond to the ways that we understand ourselves in our context. These notions are not revolutionary: that we each read scripture with a lens shaped by our own perspectives and the influence of our tribes.

If we accept this presumption, how might we understand Jesus’ words here? Some have interpreted Jesus’ teaching (or rather, the subsequent Christian tradition) as delaying justice for existing suffering into a transcendent Kingdom. Similarly, some have understood such a subversion as weaker people creating a moral system so that they can exert power over stronger people. Some read this passage as an imperative that the followers of Jesus be meek, whether in possession or in desire. Each of these readings aids in constructing Christian identity, either from the outside as critique, or from the inside as a participant. Is it possible to read this scripture as an imperative to abandon our quest to further construct identity? Is this a case of losing our lives in order to find them?

The Kingdom of God belongs to the meek, as Jesus denotes possession in his statement. Thus, if one does not belong to “the meek”, then one does not possess the Kingdom of God. Jesus also uses a present verb to describe this possession. Jesus did not say, “Blessed are the meek, for yours will be the Kingdom of God.” Unless something has changed since Jesus spoke these words, the meek currently possess the Kingdom of God. Jesus capitalizes this statement of possession by emphasizing that the meek are blessed.

I take away several points of emphasis from Jesus’ statement here, and each point leads me further from a quest to construct some sense of identity. In fact, this statement challenges that quest in its essence. First, if I am not meek, then the Kingdom does not belong to me. Now, as mentioned above, this notion has lead people to reconstruct their identities as “meek” in the past. However, I read this to mean that if I am not meek, then I am sojourning in someone else’s territory when I step foot into the Kingdom of God. I have become the foreigner, the stranger, and the wanderer. Neither bible study, nor donation, nor volunteering, nor virtue purchase a plot of land in this Kingdom.

Subsequently, the ones who possess the Kingdom are blessed. Channeling the ancients, blessed refers to a life of divine favor, or a life to be sought after. If we want to envision “our best life”, then, at least in part, we should expect to be meek. I remember listening to a pastor talk about spending time with a local businessman who had become a multi-billionaire because he wanted to learn from someone who “obviously” had the wisdom and blessing of God. Clearly, this is not what Jesus envisioned. Meek refers to someone who is bent over, cowering, low to the ground, impoverished, and destitute. In other words, the meek are those who have been put on the opposite of a pedestal; they have been put into the pit. Laying low, the meek are often imperceptible in our field of vision. We pass by the meek every day, either averting our eyes so that we can avoid inconveniencing our routine self-affirmations, or simply gazing through the meek, as they are unworthy of our attention. The meek are a difficult group to pose for our standard, as they are invisible to our eyes.

So, if I am not meek, then what am I? Jesus’ teaching makes me become a question to myself. Rather than declaring myself blessed, I ask for mercy, because I am not the blessed. Rather than asking to be sought out or listened to, I would rather seek out and listen to those who are nearly impossible to see. I need to see rather than be seen. In an age of pictures, opinions, rationales, posts, likes, subcultures, logos, brands, bylines, and buzzwords, Jesus’ words here tear down rather than construct. I am not. Or maybe, I need to learn from those who don’t quite have an “I am”, or whose “I am” sits like Lazarus being licked by the dogs. Rather than build a temple to myself, should I not search under every stone to find the meek, the blessed, sitting just outside the gate? These are the ones who possess the Kingdom, and these are the ones that are our blessed.


Darius Abyecto
Polymath, zenarchist and all around monkey wrencher. My passions include reading the fine print, making lists, and the Bourse du Travail. I always learn from the mistakes of others who take my advice. Currently pursuing a PhD in the architecture of pits and wells.

Oaths

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Snarky Faith 4/12/16

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A rundown of whether or not Christians should take oaths. What does Jesus say about oaths and how should we contextualize His call in our own lives. Join us as we wade through the the act of taking oaths. I swear it’s worth your time. Tune in to find out.

The Prosperity Gospel

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Snarky Faith 3/22/16

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A rundown of the twisted theology behind the prosperity gospel. When American exceptionalism mixes with greed all you need to do is toss in a dash of scripture and you’ve got the prosperity gospel. Join us as we skewer the deception behind this movement of twisted Christianity. Are we right on or completely wrong? Tune in to find out.

Journey Into Lent

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Snarky Faith 2/16/16

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A rundown of the postures we should take as we journey into Lent. Lent is the period before Easter where Christians focus on simple living, prayer, and fasting in order to grow closer to God. Join us as we talk about how to walk through the Lenten season. Are we right on or way off? Tune in to find out.

Check out the #30SecondBible

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30secondbible

I was recently contacted about Jim Kast-Keat’s latest project: The #30SecondBible. When I first read the title, I laughed. How can someone summarize a book of the Bible in 30 seconds? Well, I was wrong.

Their website describes the project like this:

“The #30SecondBible series features dozens of voices reflecting on the Bible. From Genesis to Revelation, you will hear summaries of each book and reflections on the good news they contain. This is the Bible for busy people, thirty seconds at a time.”

These bite sized snippets are rich with insight and perspective. It’s been a joy to watch through them during this Lenten season. The different videos feature contributors from the likes of Rob Bell, Brian McLaren, Diana Butler Bass, Rev. John C. Dorhauer, Rev. Emily Scott, Doug Pagitt, Rev. Will Gafney, Ph.D., Kent Dobson, Mike McHargue, Rev. Jes Kast-Keat, Rev. John Russell Stanger, and more.

Here’s a taste of Leviticus in 30 seconds:

Do yourself a favor and check out this creative, rich and insightful project.

twitter.com/ThirtySOL

facebook.com/ThirtySOL

youtube.com/c/ThirtySecondsOrLess